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The Stick-Up Man

Realistic & Modern Factions

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The Stick-Up Man

I've seen many people portray factions the wrong way, don't get me wrong, though. I'm not an expert, I'm just trying to help here. This guide will probably be huge, but I want to start off small and let you guys suggest me with what to continue.

 

CONTENT

I. Guide Summary

II. Organized Crime Groups & Gangs

II.1. LCN

II.2. Norteños

III.3. Motorcycle Clubs

 

I. Guide Summary

I just want to summarize what this gude will be about. It's 2017, soon 2018. I've seen many people "roleplay in the past," and you probably don't know what I mean by this. That's why I've decided to start off with LCN factions, because they could give a pretty good example of what I'm trying to say here. Anyway, keep on reading.

 

II. Organized Crime Groups & Gangs

 

II.1. LCN

I've been in the LCN roleplay scene for quite a while, matter of fact, nearly during my whole roleplay career. I've done different things, of course. Lately, my interest faded away, but that doesn't change the fact that I'll always have love for LCN. I wouldn't say it frustrates me, but I would really like to see factions be portrayed the correct way, especially LCN factions. They play a huge role on every roleplay server. What I meant earlier when I said that many people "roleplay in the past" is that people don't seem to understand that things aren't what they used to be. Enough of that, though. I'll just get straight to the point. What I'm trying to say is: a modern-day LCN faction won't have a guy called Vito Siciliano who still believes in the Mafia's ten commandments, a modern-day LCN faction won't recreate Christopher Moltisanti's induction every single time they introduce a new member. Sure, some things will stick forever, but times change and nobody will take you seriously if you make a faction and try to portray Al Pacino, Marlon Brando as Don Corleone, Al Capone and so on. Most of the mobsters you know are second-generation Italians and nearly everything has been Americanized. Having your faction start off as a crew is something I've always liked and supported. It really gives development time to you and your faction members (e.g. Your faction is a crew of the San Fierro-based Buscaglia crime family). Development is the key to having a successful faction, whatever faction, really. Also, mobsters sell and some of them do drugs. Mobsters have beards. Whatever you have read about the old school Mafia, trust me, it doesn't apply nowadays. The rules of the Mafia don't really matter, well not at all, they're pretty much built on hypocrisy (e.g. If a rule gives me advantage in a specific situation, I'll apply it.), nowadays it's money over rules. It's all about making money, and honestly, it's always been about making money. As for ranks, you got a boss, an underboss, an advisor (consigliere), captains, members (made guys) and associates. The underboss plays a very important role, he's out on the street, he's the eyes and ears of the boss. The advisor is usually a guy favored by the boss, the word advisor speaks for itself. Captains run crews, and so do made guys. A made guy can have his own crew. Made guys are official members of the family. Associates are usually aspiring members of the family, it might take a long time for an associate to prove himself and join the family. Every family has a different way of recruiting and accepting people. I personally think that videos will give you a better idea of how things should be presented, so I'll just leave links to the best (in my opinion) material that can help you understand more.

 

Episode 1 is about John Alite (former Gambino associate and hitman for John Gotti Jr.) and Mikey DiLeonardo (former Gambino captain). Both rats.

 

 

I also suggest checking out Joseph's Merlino current status. He's fighting a couple of cases, some of them are a pretty good read. 

 

II.2 Norteños

I don't plan on making a Sureño chapter, considering we're roleplaying in San Fierro. Home of the Norte. And I'm truly happy that Norteño factions will start to show up more and more, somehow they didn't fit in LS, and they shouldn't. Just like Sureño sets pay tribute to eMe, Norteños pay tribute to the Nuestra Familia while in US federal and correctional facilities. Something very common to 90% of you, Norte gangs represent the number 14 and "n" is the 14th letter of the alphabet. They're definitely smaller than the Sureños, but don't get me wrong, that doesn't make them less dangerous. The higher echelons are involved in murder, assault, arms and drug trafficking, and the list goes on. Another thing about Norte gangs/sets is that they're not strictly Mexican, they accept all ethnicities as long as you're down to bang with them. Recruitment in Norteño gangs is different. Once you make your bones, you get jumped in. Most gangs jump you in. Some gangs might give you a tattoo, and that's it. You're now a member of the gang. The whole recruitment thing depends on the set itself. Every set operates and makes money differently. What all Norteño sets have in common is that they're under the Nuestra Familia and they all bang the same color. That doesn't mean that Norteño sets don't fight between each other. It's very common for small sets to fight one another for power and turf. Norteño gangs deal with all kinds of drugs, many gang members use drugs on a daily basis, and some members of the gang are kids and teenagers. Some common words that Norteños call Sureños by: surrat, skrapa, sewer rat etc. Here are two videos, if you're interested in finding out more. I couldn't find anything for specific Norte gangs/sets, but I think a good documentary on the Nuestra Familia would give you a good idea of how ruthless these men are.

 

This one is pretty interesting, I highly recommend watching it.

 

 

Also, check out Woodie for good Norte music.

 

III.3. Motorcycle Clubs

It's about time I write a third chapter to my guide. In this chapter, I'll talk about motorcycle clubs. You might have noticed that I've put them under organized crime groups and gangs, that's because not all motorcycle clubs are completely legal. I will talk about motorcycle clubs and their activities in general, but I'll focus myself on the Vagos. I'll do that, because I've spent a long time in Vagos MC factions and I'm more familiar with their ways. Currently, there are five major international motorcycle gangs in the world today. We got the Hells Angels, the Bandidos, the Outlaws, the Mongols and the Rebels. Their origins start at the end of WWII when some ex-servicemen returning from the war found their civilian lives boring. Small numbers formed groups and headed to the highways on high-powered motorbikes in search of adventure and excitement. I can talk a lot about history, but I ain't here to do that. I'm here to give you a good example of how a modern-day motorcycle club faction should look like. I want to start off the with the ranks and structure of a motorcycle club. What all MCs have in common is their structure. We have a President. The prez is the leader of the chapter. He is the club's figurehead and is usually the spokesman when dealing with police or media. The president is the chairman at club meetings and represents the chapter at national meetings. Vice President. The vice president is second in charge and fills in when the president is away. The vice prez is often the heir apparent to the club's leadership although this isn’t always the case. It's his job to make sure that matters passed at club meetings are carried out satisfactorily. Secretary. The secretary is responsible for the club's paperwork. He keeps minutes of meetings and records dates of significant events, such as anniversary dates (when prospects gain their patch). He corresponds with other gangs and it's his job to keep members informed of upcoming events. The secretary is usually responsible for keeping records of club assets although the treasurer will do this in some gangs. Treasurer. The treasurer is the chapters' money-man and he's in charge of collecting club fees, run funds etc. and paying the bills. The treasurer is responsible for collecting any debts owed to the gang and usually gets the job of checking out business opportunities prior to any decisions being made. The treasurer is usually the person who handles the proceeds of a gang's illegal activity. The positions of secretary and treasurer are often combined. Sergeant at Arms. The sergeant at arms is basically the gang's “policeman” although most would not like to be referred to in this way! He enforces club procedures and maintains order at club meetings. The sergeant is in charge of security at gang events and he is responsible for “back ups” (attacks on rivals). The sergeant looks after the gang's firearms and other weapons. The sergeant at arms is sometimes known as the "master of arms", (although "sergeant at arms" has become much more common). In some gangs, the sergeant wears a military style sergeant's badge. Road Captain. Most motorcycle gangs have a position known as Road Captain. He is in charge of logistics during a club run. He plans the route and organises refuelling stops etc. The Road Captain rides at the front and leads the pack with the president. The position of Road Captain is usually a "non executive" position. Patchmembers. Patchmembers are members of the club who have earned the right to wear the gang's colours, after a suitable period spent "prospecting".  They take part in the running of the club and attend the gang's weekly meeting (“church”). They are commonly referred to as “members” or, in some clubs, "patches". Prospect. A prospect is a “prospective” member of the club who is yet to earn his patch. Prospects are expected to do what they are told and follow the orders of patchmembers. They must be prepared to engage in illegal activities to prove their loyalty to the gang. Prospects have no voting rights and do not attend meetings unless invited in. Hangarounds. Some gangs have a stage before "prospect" which is known as "hangaround". The purpose of the hangaround stage is to become known by all members before being accepted as a prospect. The hangaround period can be up to six months. Most gangs hold regular meetings (which they call “church”) that all patchmembers must attend to discuss matters relating to the club. The majority of gangs are run as a democracy with every patchmember having one vote. Many gangs hold annual elections to select their officers while others vote on a specific position when it becomes vacant or when another member mounts a challenge. Before talking about illegal activies, I'd like to point out that motorcycle gangs have chapters. Let's use the Vagos for example, Vagos have chapters in different countries, with different officers, members and so on. However, every MC has a mother chapter and that's the first chapter of the club. The president of the mother chapter serves as president of the entire MC. For example Vagos' mother chapter is in San Bernandino. Most motorcycle gangs are involved in drugs and arms trafficking, murder and more.

 

Quote

It was "one of the largest coordinated law enforcement probes ever conducted in Southern California". The investigators seized 95 illegal firearms, illegal drugs, $6,000 cash, and two stolen motorcycles. An ATF agent called thegroup a "ruthless criminal bike gang" that deals in "guns,drugs, and death."

 

Quote

On August 13, 2011 law enforcement authorities reported that the Vagos Motorcycle Club and the Galloping Goose Motorcycle Club were involved in a shootout which shut down traffic on I-44 near Waynesville, Missouri. The local 9-1-1 center received about 20 calls, which reported that approximately 20 men were fighting, and that shots had been fired.

 

Quote

In 1974, four Vagos members were convicted and sentenced to death for murdering University of New Mexico student William Velten. The four, Richard Greer, Ronald Keine, Clarence Smith and Thomas Gladish, spent 17 months on death row, but during the appeals process, Kerry Rodney Lee confessed to the murder.

 

Vagos have a long crime history and many Vagos members are ruthless. There's one Vagos chapter in my country, but I don't know if they're involved in criminal activies, probably not to be honest. However, motorcycle gangs are known for crystal meth. Most gangs use rolling meth labs (RVs) to cook. Many meth labs have booby traps guarding them from intruders. I'd also like to point out that MC gang members are not full-time criminals, they have normal lives and normal jobs just like everybody else. See an MC as a crime family. It's something you're commited to. It's like a brotherhood. You make money together. You ride with your brothers. You die for your brothers. Honestly, I don't know what else to add about illegal activies, I could add some more stuff about meth labs if you guys are instered. Let me know. I'm just gonna add a couple of things about the Vagos and wrap it up. Vagos prospects are pretty much treated like slaves. They're mocked most of the time. They're forced to do things just to make members and officers laugh. If a patched member asks a prospect to buy him food at 4:00 AM and ride 100 kilometers to bring it, the prospect will have to do it. I'll quote some Vagos-related crimes from Wikipedia in case you're interested.

 

Quote

Nugget Casino shooting

On September 23, 2011, Vagos members were involved in a shooting at John Ascuaga's Nugget in Sparks, Nevada, where Jeffrey Pettigrew, the president of the San Jose, California chapter of Hells Angels was killed, and Vagos members were wounded. The next day, a Vagos member was wounded at a rally by a drive-by shooter. On September 29, police arrested Ernesto Manuel Gonzales, a Vagos member, at the University of California, San Francisco, for killing Pettigrew. On December 7, police announced that they had arrested Gary Rudnick, the vice-president of the Los Angeles chapter of Vagos, for instigating the fight that led to the shooting. Rudnick later pleaded guilty to second degree murder in a bargaining agreement. The trial for the two Vagos members, as well as a Hells Angels member who fired at a crowd, was held on October 29, 2012.

 

 

Quote

Other incidents

In October 1998, police arrested more than a dozen Vagos members for kidnapping, drug and weapons crimes, following a two-year undercover investigation. In September 2004, state police arrested 26 members and seized more than $125,000 in cash, drugs and guns. On March 9, 2006, law enforcement conducted "Operation 22 Green", which involved 700 personnel from Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives and local police and sheriff's departments. The operation resulted in the arrest of 25 Vagos members and associates for violating firearms and drugs policies. It was "one of the largest coordinated law enforcement probes ever conducted in Southern California". The investigators seized 95 illegal firearms, illegal drugs, $6,000 cash, and two stolen motorcycles. An ATF agent called the group a "ruthless criminal bike gang" that deals in "guns, drugs, and death." Operation 22 Green and its lead-up were used as the basis for the first season of the television series Gangland Undercover.

 

I highly suggest watching Gangland Undercover, even if you're not interested in roleplaying a Vago, it is a beautifully-made TV series.

 

 

The last two aren't documentaries, but they're pretty neat. Check them out. By the way, the Galloping Goose MC barely has any young members. Thanks for reading, hope you enjoyed. This guide is WIP.

Edited by The Stick-Up Man
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phencyclidine father

watching Goodfellas & the sopranos is sufficient!!!!

 

ot: nice guide!!!!

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Montreal

I think the problem nowadays is mostly people put faction before roleplay, when it should be the opposite. Figure out what the roleplay and the characters are gonna be about before you even consider doing a faction. The faction is nothing more than a thread except maybe what ties all of the parts together from an OOC perspective and the roleplay is everything that matters, hence, your characters and roleplay should stand on its own without any thread or whatever. Just look at the real world, use any solid ideas you get from other media, but question it regardless, and keep improving even if you suck doing something you're new to. That's why I always suggest people start off on characters that aren't too in the shit because that might be harder to roleplay than getting introduced to crime or whatever over time and have time to learn OOCly to portray your character better when the situations finally deem it.

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smallz

There's more and more smaller gangs in the same territory, some follow the history (ex: Compton Crips) some are newly based and most of them beef with eachother but there's a few who stand up together. Shit is rather different than it was before, in the 90's you mostly had one gang control a territory and the beefs they had with other larger gangs were from other territories and counties. Everything is possible nowadays and inner beef between sets is realistic, don't be afraid to do it. Also, there's almost no gangs that hit the corners and sell drugs, shit is done way differently now. Great thread, hopefully you continue to write it and include other types of illegal roleplay.

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The Stick-Up Man

Thanks for the feedback. I'll write some shit down about gangs, most definitely.

Edited by The Stick-Up Man

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Jondetti

A great guide. I already know the things you said but it is deeply helpfull for the starters in LCN world.

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The Stick-Up Man

Updated with a Norteños chapter.

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Bouncer

The LCN part is just extraordinary, that's how I have learnt to roleplay LCN properly in the first place. Great job.

 

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Brand

When it comes to LCN, rules are the most important part, otherwise it won't be an organized crime, you should add that!

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The Stick-Up Man

Not really.

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Bospy
58 minutes ago, Brand said:

When it comes to LCN, rules are the most important part, otherwise it won't be an organized crime, you should add that!

 

Actually not true. The decline of the LCN is because less and less people are following the rules, most modern mafias willingly break the rules if it means power. Watch some documentaries on the modern mafia and guys like Henry Hill - they brought the cascade, everyone breaks the rules after guys like Henry Hill.

 

Also a decently written guide - worth noting, Surenos have started expanding power bases north of Bakersfield due to the fact they significantly outnumber Norteno gangs, so it wouldn't be strange to see one or two Sureno gangs. But San Francisco is definitely a Norteno central. Also worth noting Nortenos are not strangers to allying with blacks - they're natural allies against the Aryan Brotherhood and Surenos.

Edited by Bospy
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The Stick-Up Man

Updated with an MC chapter.

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Nigel_Kage

Very nice guide. I personally believe and feel, the reason most people portray factions wrong is because they get their knowledge from wrong places. Instead of learning by watching accurate documentaries and articles, lot of people base their factions on movies and TV series, which you outlined precisely. Most of the times, instead of being themselves and creating their own unique roleplay ideas, they try to directly or indirectly imitate the TV counterparts. And the worse part is, if the leader of the faction picks up his knowledge from wrong sources, chances are, he will point his newly appointed members to the same wrong sources, which just starts a whole domino effect.

Edited by Nigel Kage
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The Stick-Up Man

Thanks, appreciate all the feedback.

 

 

Edited by The Stick-Up Man

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AceS|

Good read, surprised you didn't write anything about Asian gangs or Asian organized crime especially because the server's based in San Fierro. I might write one up sometime though. That's my specialty. 

Edited by AceS|

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